2018-2019 State Salary Increase and Minimum Wage FAQ

General/SHRA Employees Faculty/EHRA Employees  Minimum State Salary Increase
General/SHRA Employees

Who is eligible for the salary increase?
To be eligible for the mandatory 2% salary increase, an employee must meet
ALL of the following criteria:

  • Classified as a permanent (full- or part-time) SHRA employee.
     
  • Have a performance review on file for the most recent review cycle AND received either a “meets expectations” or “exceeds expectations” rating.
     
  • Have no current formal disciplinary action issued by the University.
     
  • Employed in a permanent or time-limited position by the University as of Oct. 1, 2017.
     
  • Employed by the University in active status for the Aug. 31 payroll, when the raise will be implemented.

What percentage will the salary increase be?
The increase for qualifying SHRA employees will be 2%, based on their June 30, 2018, salary.

Is the increase based on my current salary?
The increase is based on your salary as of June 30, 2018.

When can I expect to see the raise reflected in my pay?
You can expect to see the increase with your Aug. 31 payroll, retroactive to July 1. This means your Aug. 31 payroll will be higher because it will be catching up for previous pay periods.

What is the difference between the mandatory SHRA pay increase and a discretionary increase?
The mandatory SHRA pay increase was funded through UNC Charlotte’s allocated portion of the $20 million provided by the General Assembly to the UNC System. Discretionary increases were not funded by the state and are dependent on each university’s ability to fund them. UNC Charlotte does not have available funding to provide discretionary increases this year.

Who decided how the raise process would be implemented?
The General Assembly allocated $20 million to the UNC System to support raises for employees. The System’s Board of Governors then determined how that funding would be allocated to institutions and the parameters for implementing the raise process.

Is the University committed to supporting employees through pay increases? 
Yes, UNC Charlotte is committed to investing in its employees when there are available funds to do so. That is why the University has funded apart from the state 10 strategic salary adjustments since 2007, totaling nearly $28 million. More information about these adjustments is available in the chart below. 

Total Dollars Spent with Benefits on Strategic Salary Adjustments
Fiscal Year Employee Group Total Dollars Spent w/ Benefits
2007 SHRA $2 million
2008 SHRA $2.7 million
2009 SHRA $1.9 million
2013 SHRA $2.16 million
2015 EHRA Non-Faculty $2.76 million
2016 Full-Time Faculty $5.28 million
2016 SHRA $4.56 million
2017 EHRA Non-Faculty $2.7 million
2017 Part-Time Faculty $1.1 million
2018 Full-Time Faculty $2.8 million
Total   $27.6 million

How is the UNC System annual raise process different from the process for employees at other state agencies?
Unlike other state agencies, the General Assembly did not provide funding for the UNC System to establish an across-the-board salary increase for all employees. Instead, the General Assembly provided the System $20 million, and then the Board of Governors determined how the money would be distributed to each institution and how the raise process would be implemented.

Are part-time employees eligible for the salary increase?
Part-time permanent employees are eligible for the salary increase if they meet the necessary criteria (outlined above).

Are employees who are out on leave eligible for the salary increase?  
Employees who are on family medical leave, short-term disability or other approved types of leave and who meet the eligibility criteria will receive the increase when they return to active employment.

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EHRA Staff/Faculty

Why are all faculty and EHRA employees not receiving 2% raises?
The UNC System, including UNC Charlotte, did not receive state funding for an across-the-board increase this year. The Board of Governors determined the received funds should first be used for the mandatory SHRA raise. Any other increases would have to be supplemented at the University level.

After implementing the mandatory 2% pay increase for eligible SHRA employees, there is a small amount of funding remaining, but it is inadequate to support an increase for all EHRA and faculty employees. The University is assessing how these funds may used in more targeted ways and will share information as soon as it is available. Unfortunately, unlike in previous years, UNC Charlotte does not have any additional funds this year to supplement what was provided by the General Assembly.

The University has previously provided raises for all EHRA and faculty employees. What is different about this year?
For a variety of complex reasons, the University’s budgetary situation is different this year and it will not see the usual infusion of enrollment increase funds that have been used previously to augment employee compensation.  

Part of this is due to a change mandated by the General Assembly in 2017 about how enrollment increase funds are calculated. The allocation of these funds is no longer based upon projections, but is now based upon the students who actually enroll in coursework.  And of the students who actually enroll, the funding is based on a matrix that reflects the level of the student and the cost of the disciplines in which the students enroll for courses.

In addition to changes we saw in the disciplinary mix of the credit hours produced by students, the University also experienced a marked decline in the enrollment of nonresidents, particularly international students. Since non-residents pay significantly higher amounts of tuition than North Carolina resident student, that decline in non-residents reduces available tuition revenues.  

Additionally, in 2016  the General Assembly established a fixed-tuition policy for all of the campuses, further limiting normally expected tuition revenue.  

Is the University committed to supporting employees through pay increases?
Yes, UNC Charlotte is committed to investing in its employees when there are available funds to do so. That is why the University has funded apart from the state 10 strategic salary adjustments since 2007, totaling nearly $28 million. More information about these adjustments is available in the chart below. 

Total Dollars Spent with Benefits on Strategic Salary Adjustments
Fiscal Year Employee Group Total Dollars Spent w/ Benefits
2007 SHRA $2 million
2008 SHRA $2.7 million
2009 SHRA $1.9 million
2013 SHRA $2.16 million
2015 EHRA Non-Faculty $2.76 million
2016 Full-Time Faculty $5.28 million
2016 SHRA $4.56 million
2017 EHRA Non-Faculty $2.7 million
2017 Part-Time Faculty $1.1 million
2018 Full-Time Faculty $2.8 million
Total   $27.6 million

Minimum State Salary

What is the new state minimum salary?
The N.C. General Assembly has set $31,200 as the minimum salary for all full-time (40 hours per week) state employees. This is the equivalent of $15 per hour.

How does the 2% mandatory SHRA pay increase affect the new state minimum salary?
The 2% mandatory pay increase must be implemented first to see if it will move employees to the minimum state salary of $31,200. Anyone who still falls below the minimum salary after the 2% increase will be raised to $31,200.

If I fall below the $31,200 minimum salary, how will my 2% salary increase be calculated?
Your 2% increase will be based on your salary as of June 30, 2018, not the new $31,200 minimum salary.

Do part-time permanent employees qualify for the minimum salary adjustment?
Yes, part-time permanent employees will see their salary pro-rated based on the hours they work. A yearly $31,200 salary is equal to a pay rate of $15 an hour.

Who is funding the minimum salary adjustment?
The state is providing funds, separate from those for the 2% increase, to fund the minimum salary adjustment for employees paid through general funds. For employees not paid through general funds, the increase will be covered by their departments or units.

When will I see the new minimum salary reflected in my pay?
You can expect to see the increase with your Sept. 14 payroll, retroactive to July 1. This means your Sept. 14 payroll will be higher because it will be catching up for previous pay periods.

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